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How to "Bar Lace" your Boots
By Jonathan Bocek 


 
With the introduction of the schnurschuhe (ankle boot) in 1941 the German Landser from then on had to lace his boots much like their fathers did during the later part of the Great War.  Bar Lacing (also known as Straight or European Lacing) was & still is a popular way for people to lace their shoes in Europe. 

We can't say that Bar Lacing was the only method used by the Wehrmacht, but it does appear to be the style most commonly found in original photographs. The reason for this may have something to do with its benefits. You see, this method creates a nice tight & secure lacing.  This prevents dirt & debris from getting into the boot slightly better than the other methods.  Another benefit is very practical for combat purposes.  The horizontal sections of shoelace can be cut easily to remove the boot in the event of a foot injury.  Lastly, in general this method has a neat/clean look & are generally a little easier to pull tight because you can easily get
a couple of fingers under the straight sections.

The images & lacing instructions below were made possible by Ian Fieggen of www.fieggen.comI would like to thank Ian for his help & for allowing us to post his work here.
 

     

Lacing Technique:

1. The lace runs straight across the bottom (grey section) and the ends are fed into both bottom eyelets.

2. One end of the lace (yellow end) crosses diagonally underneath, emerges and runs straight across the second set of eyelets.

3. The other end (blue end) crosses diagonally, emerges and runs straight across the next set.

4. Continue up the shoe, alternately feeding in one end and then the other.
Lacing Technique:

1. The lace runs straight across the bottom (grey section) and the ends are fed into both bottom eyelets.

2. One end of the lace (yellow end) runs straight up the right side, emerges and runs straight across the second set of eyelets.

3. Both ends now run straight up the left side, each skipping one eyelet before emerging two eyelets higher up.

4. Continue running both ends across the shoe, then straight up two eyelets at a time, until one end reaches the top.

5. The other end then runs straight across the second last set of eyelets, then straight up to the top.
Lacing Technique:

1. The lace runs straight across the bottom (grey section) and the ends are fed into both bottom eyelets.

2. One end of the lace (blue end) is fed straight up the left side all the way to, and emerges from, the top left eyelet.

3. The other end (yellow end) runs straight up the right side, emerges and runs straight across the second set of eyelets.

4. The same end (yellow end) works its way up and across back and forth through the remaining eyelets.

 


Sources:
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Diagrams & instructions from: http://www.fieggen.com/shoelace/lacingmethods.htm.  

   

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